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Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby ojibwe » Sun Mar 16, 2014 2:17 pm

Have you tried sandwich the nichrome wire between fiberglass cloth coated with orange hi temp silicone.
VJ.
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby Chemsolder » Sun Mar 16, 2014 10:48 pm

Jon dont think the duct tape is going to be a great longterm solution, I think the suggestion from ojibwe of fiberglass tape coated with high heat rtv will likely be a better choice. It will just require a bit of experimentation, which is the fun part anyway.
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby ianpc » Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:11 pm

for my hill style form i used heavy duty double sided carpet tape to run the wires between, i use 1/4 angle iron as the form and put a strip covering the form then laid the nichrome onto the tape, used another strip of tape on top of the wires and stuck 1/16 strip of aluminium on top of that as a pressure strip... for the top strips i used the u glu fabric tape i think it was BK found... i have put 3 bows through with this set up and it is working well so far... not sure how long the tape will hold up tho
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby Jon in Montana » Wed Mar 19, 2014 4:20 pm

I just got done stitching up a new set of tapes. Talk about a pain....

I did my first glue up with a previous set the other day - a 48" kids bow. Once it was glued and clamped, I turned on the strips for 40 minutes, shut them down and was tinkering with other stuff for about 1 hour. Pulled it off the form and started into it. Worked perfect! Less than 2 hours from glue up to rough tiller. Pretty stinkin' sweet!

I see no issues with these sewn ones. I think with the appropriate tape, adhesive would work fine, too.

One other option which I might try and I think it would work great if the glue holds - sandwich the wire between 2 pieces of .030 wood lam and glue them together. The wire's not too thick to keep the glue from holding. Some 2 ton epoxy should work - it's good up to 600 degrees if I remember right....

I'll let you know if I get around to it.
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby Chemsolder » Wed Mar 19, 2014 4:53 pm

Glued up two with the duct tape...tape itself has faired fair...these wont last a real long time probably 5 to 10 bows...the rubber is proving to be a real problem, too much pressure and it gets all messed up, may have to find better rubber strips. each strip only costs a few dollars in wire and maybe .50 cents in tape so cost isnt a problem and it just takes a few minutes to tape one up. Oh well cheap experiment now to try a couple of other methods...
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby arrowlauncherdj » Wed Mar 19, 2014 9:17 pm

Tattman, used two thin wood parallels like .030 or something like that and glued them over the wire mesh. His idea was to glue one onto the form so you only had to worry about one during glue up. The ones he did for me worked great. I got an email from him the other day and he said he's just been very busy with a new job but will log on soon to catch up.

Dave
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby Chemsolder » Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:06 pm

Think I may try that with the lams...been grinding my own any way so it isnt a lot of trouble to do. Was he using smoothon to glue them or some other type of epoxy? Yeah judging by the tooling he used building bows I can imagine his real job gets busy...also had a eureka moment marking the center line of a bow tonight. Been using a 12" machinist scale to mark the riser center and building off that using other longer aluminum pieces looked into getting a 3 ft scale :shock: wow thats an expensice tool...so walla I have a buch of spring steel on hand in the form of a bandsaw blades clamped old 1/2" blade down after breaking it then ensuring it was straight marked the center all at once...cheap tool does just what I need too.
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby tattman2 » Wed Mar 26, 2014 12:55 am

Hey guys sorry for being away for so long but life has gotten a bit busy lately :) :roll: Chemsolder what is your math on the 110v strips you are making? I personally would steer away from using high AC voltage on these strips for multiple reasons.One being obviously :roll: electrocution two is safely distributing the heat through the strip without hot spots and three being regulation of the power in an efficient and safe way.110volts ac passes through your body a lot easier than 24 DC.Ohm's law says so ;) But if you comfortable AC than if it works it works :) If your strips can't be plugged in and sat on a bench exposed without burning out I would not use them .The dimmer switch or any heat regulation should be for fine tuning an already manageable heat.Just my opinion :)
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby ojibwe » Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:23 pm

Tattman,
What wattage DC power supply are you using?
What are you using for regulation?

Thanks
VJ
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Re: Heat tapes....SUCCESS! for $20

Postby tattman2 » Wed Mar 26, 2014 8:43 pm

The wattage is a direct result of volts x amps with amps being the more important part of a power supply as this is the amount of heat it can dissipate before it overheats.Kind of like the breakers in your house which keep your wires in the wall from frying.A 10 amp power supply for 24v and even higher amp if you use 12v ,because the lower the voltage the higher the amperage to produce the same amount of power(watts) I=P/V
As for regulating I am working on a power regulator made just for these heat strips utilizing Pulse Width Modulation and is a lot more efficient and safe.With digital readouts it is a lot easier to fine tune and replicate temps 8-) Like I mentioned before,regulating is just for fine tuning and may not always be necessary
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