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The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

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The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Sun Oct 16, 2011 9:04 pm

I was surfing the net, as usual, searching for some shooting nuggets that may help my quest to be a better shot. I’ve never really been a good shot; probably never will be, but I always strive to make every shot better than the last. Anyway…. I ran across this post that I thought was the epitome of attaining complete control of the shot.

The author of this post is a member here. I didn’t ask his permission to post this, but he has the power to delete if he wishes. As for me…. I think every archer needs to put this one in the memory banks. If we could get to this place, we’d surely be… an ARCHER.

Yohon wrote: ..... be more concerned with how you shoot it rather than if you hit it or not and while thats taken a while to sink in for me Im really starting to believe it!!!! Getting comfortable "in the center" has helped too or getting on and staying there. I work all year long for thoses few rare seconds that I am at full draw on a critter and Ive been learning to enjoy it and not rush it.....get on, stay there and let the shot run and grin while all thats goin on
"Archery is really very simple. You just have to do the exact same thing on every shot"
Bill Leslie, July 22, 2017

"Form is everything."
Al Cole, June 7, 2008
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Bender » Sun Oct 16, 2011 9:19 pm

An excellent point. Very good advice. Very mental. Often tough to do. Kind of also touches on that "Zen" feeling when all is going as it should. Anyway it points out that the desired end result, hitting whatever we're aiming at, isn't going to happen unless we're into what we're doing at that moment, executing the shot. If we're all tripped out over what is supposed to happen 3 seconds from now, how can we possibly get NOW done correctly?
Personally I shoot with my form on auto pilot. It is trained in and my body knows how to pull it off far better than my conscious mind does. My conscious mind is immersed in aiming. Gives it something to do so it can't screw up my form and execution. HOWEVER although I am into the concentration of aiming, I CAN"T be into "I hope I hit it! I Better hit it! Oh crap what if I don't hit? Etc etc." That is thinking 3 seconds into the future. That will ruin everything for sure, as I am then no longer in the moment.
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Yohon » Mon Oct 17, 2011 4:24 am

:oops: You of all people, know full well how much dang time/work has gone into it and its finally starting to bear fruit!!! Unlike before Im now starting to look forward to getting a big one in front of me to see how good my desire is to shoot a good arrow vs "oh I hope I dont miss this buck" ;)

Bender.....THAT is a great, GREAT point:

"it points out that the desired end result, hitting whatever we're aiming at, isn't going to happen unless we're into what we're doing at that moment, executing the shot. If we're all tripped out over what is supposed to happen 3 seconds from now, how can we possibly get NOW done correctly?"
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Bender » Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:00 am

Thax, I just kind of considered it a summation of what you and Jim are saying.
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Matt_Potter » Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:12 am

Sort of interesting - In many ways shooting 3D and hunting is just an extension of the bridge. You add pressure that you need to over come as you move your distances back while completing the bridge. 3D and hunting just add a new and different kind of pressure that we need to over come. But, you really can't move back to the bale and duplicate those shots at shorter ranges to work the bridge with.

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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Yohon » Mon Oct 17, 2011 5:54 pm

Your right in that respect Matt, its all in the pressure that we put on ourselves. Bad thing about critters is that its very limited "practice" and there is NO WAY, that I have found to duplicate that pressure in any way other than hunting.
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Stykshooter » Mon Oct 17, 2011 6:33 pm

Your right in that respect Matt, its all in the pressure that we put on ourselves. Bad thing about critters is that its very limited "practice" and there is NO WAY, that I have found to duplicate that pressure in any way other than hunting.


Exactly! Each year that I go into bow season, that first shot on a deer is always the hardest. It is almost like I am shooting my first deer ever, the pressure I put on myself. It is not uncommon for me to miss the first shot or two before I kill a deer. But every year, once I get that first one in the freezer it is like I go on auto pilot. Things just click, my confidence goes up and I am generally pretty deadly from my tree. By the time I shoot 4 or 5 deer it is fairly routine to run through my checklist and run a Snuffer through their lungs. But for some reason, I have to go through it at the beginning of every season and of course, I still get pretty shaken when a 140 incher steps out in front of me. I am always thankful to get the opportunity to drop a couple three does before the bucks start running hard. I couldn't imaging having my first shot of the year be a P & Y buck.

That is why I could ever deer hunt out where Gino is. Only get one deer a year and it being a real nice one at that. I would, as my daughter says... "fail miserably". I need to practice on the does leading up to that opportunity.
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Matt_Potter » Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:42 pm

I think competitive 3d is the closest we can come to hunting situations.

But you are absolutely right the only way to get good at killing stuff is by killing stuff.


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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby BEN MAHER » Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:05 pm

I think that Matt has it right ... "the best way to get good at killing stuff is by killing stuff "... But having said that It is so much more enjoyable now that my confidence is coming back . Jim has progressed a lot more than I have with the bridge but like him I still look for morsels amid all the crap and Yohons little chestnut is GOLD .....

Its kinda wierd that the more I work at it and focus on the process/sequence the more I actually relax and enjoy myself . And the more relaxed and enloyment I get ... the better I do .....

I stil suck big time and remain a shadow of my former archery great self :shock: but At least I know I suck and why ... and that is quite empowering

I was telling all this to my brother , a newbie who shoots better than I do ... and he gave me the buddhist take on it [ he is a monk ] ....... it kinda made sense ...

but if he calls me grasshopper one more time ......
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Re: The essence of having COMPLETE control of the shot

Postby Fuzzy Dog » Fri Oct 21, 2011 6:47 pm

Yohon wrote:
Bender.....THAT is a great, GREAT point:

"it points out that the desired end result, hitting whatever we're aiming at, isn't going to happen unless we're into what we're doing at that moment, executing the shot. If we're all tripped out over what is supposed to happen 3 seconds from now, how can we possibly get NOW done correctly?"


I couldn't agree more. I'm slowly getting to the point that I'm more surprised when my arrow doesn't go where I expect it to than I am when it does. The whole process has been one of simplification, beginning with Yohon's advice to concentrate on running a good shot rather than worrying about where it's going to go, on to lessons with Len Cardinale and Rod Jenkins, with advice from Joe, Mike and Yohon to the point that I can now see that it actually is, again quoting Yohon, "simple, but it ain't easy."

The last obstacle, for the moment anyway, to building a shot I have confidence is was to get over the notion that the arrow is going to "go off subconsciously." I know within a range of a second or two when the arrow is going to leave, because those are the second or two following my decision to relax my fingers and let it go. Having admitted to myself that whatever the subconscious part meant it didn't translate for me, and instead concentrating on my 6 step shot routine has made me immerse more into the shot and less into the target with quite beneficial results. As long as I run my shot routine my shots seem to go where I want them to (within reason of course; I won't be busting and aspirins or molecules anytime soon). I screwed around with a lot of shot conclusions, finally concluding that for me the only one that worked was the sound of the arrow hitting the target. If I set everything properly in the first place, and hold it until the arrow hits, I'm getting some pretty decent results.

Or, as Yohon and Bender said, if I immerse myself into the moment and run my shot, the results 3 seconds later are much more likely to be pleasing than if I worry about 3 seconds from now and don't concentrate on my shot.
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