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Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Rod Jenkins » Sun Jun 27, 2010 12:47 am

Jim,congrats on doing the hard work needed to gain control over your shot...major acomplishment!

I'm in Oregon doing a clinic, but will be finished by late afternoon( whatever damn time zone I'm in this week) please do give me a call then or anytime next week.

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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Sun Jun 27, 2010 6:38 am

Thanks Rod. I appreciate the pat on the back, but I've got a feeling that "control" at five yards, and "control" of my shot maaaaaaaaaay be a little different. ;) :) I'll give you a call.

Thanks again.
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Yohon » Sun Jun 27, 2010 7:46 am

Jim, I dont think there is a much better explanation of the Bridge than what NJstickbow posted...spot on! I'd only add that there will be a distance in there that you'll squirt off a bad arrow, happens to everybody....some of us more than once ;) Its then that you'll need the discipline to stop shooting, go to the bale the rest of the session or stop for the day and then stay at that distance for 5 sessions or more, you almost want to punish yourself to not make that mistake again. I know some people are goin like this right now-- :roll:, but if youve got TP like I've had, Jim has had and others you need that hard headed discipline to prove to yourself that this system/routine is what your most comfortable with and works for you. I look at like its telling your subconscious that this is how we do this and you accept no other. Its back to the consisitency thing, if you accept any little bit of change between your bale shot and your target shot then you plant the seed of doubt into your subconscious and it'll bloom into TP again, so after doin it the same for a couple thousand arrows your subconscious starts accepting that this is how we are goin to do it and you are on your way to fun shooting BUT its almost like you have to beat your subconscious into submission and the bridge does that.
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:10 pm

Rod,

I appreciate the call and encouragement. I think I’ve got the routine, so it’s on to the bridge I go.
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:42 pm

The first attempt at the bridge at 10 yards ended after three shots with a setback—finished on the bale. I decided I was using a target too small. In my second attempt, I used a much larger target, and deliberately didn’t focus on a small area. This session was much better. Although I didn’t get in my 40 shots, I did get enough to encourage me to continue on. I finished on the bale and am looking forward to the next session.
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby superkodiak38 » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:11 am

Great thread going here Jim, I appreciate your taking us with you on your journey to better shooting and all the feedback your getting has been great too.
When you take your kid hunting and he says thank you and tells you how much he loves being in the woods with you, your day just isn't going to get any better than that.
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:15 pm

Well… I’ve made several attempts at getting 40 shots on the bridge at 10 yards without, what Rod called, a “less than” (perfect shot). I could get to 10, 15, maybe even in the 20’s, but on each occasion a “less than” would slip in and I had to finish on the bale. I decided to start at five yards rather than 10. Gee Whiz! What a difference. I got to 40 shots without a “less than” on my second try. I wonder what’s up with that? Anyway… I think I’ll just stay here a while and let it burn in before going on back.

Believe it or not, I’m really enjoying these drills.

I've got a question for you guys. I’ll try to explain what’s going. On every shot I’m going through a sequence. It’s something like this:


1 Set my stance
2 Grip the bow keeping all of it inside the lifeline
3 Take a deep hook on the string with equal pressure across each finger
4 Make sure my left elbow is rotated and the shoulder is down. Rob caught this at the clinic. Apparently my left shoulder was too high and allowing for a collapse-of sorts
5 Draw to anchor and expand to alignment
6 Continue to pull
7 Arrow leaves the string
8 Continue pulling to conclusion

Here’s the deal. I’d like to hold longer between 6 (pulling) and 7 (release). It seems the arrow is leaving before I’d like. THE QUESTION: Is this a problem? Should I stay on the bale until I can determine when the arrow leaves my fingers, or is it okay that it just “seems” to go by itself?
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby KCummings » Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:38 pm

Jim Casto Jr wrote:THE QUESTION: Is this a problem? Should I stay on the bale until I can determine when the arrow leaves my fingers, or is it okay that it just “seems” to go by itself?


Isn't that what compounders are looking for when they use a back tension release? Almost like they are surprised when it goes off?

Besides, if you're truly concentrating on the conclusion, the string leaving your fingers is just part of the process, and not the end of the shot sequence, right?

:?:

Don't mind me, I'm just thinking out loud.

:?

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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby Jim Casto Jr » Sat Jul 10, 2010 5:26 am

Remember Kevin, you're talking about a guy who has fought target panic forEVER. I've been out of control for a long, long time and this has the feeling of not being in control. I guess I'm asking, "Can you be in complete control and still have a surprise release?"
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Re: Ready to walk on the BRIDGE

Postby superkodiak38 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 6:58 am

You know what they say about opinions :D But I will take the risk and give you mine.

I know the feeling your describing. I think the answer can be found in asking your self two things:

1) Did you run your shot ?

2) What were the results ?

If you ran your shot, just like any other all the way through to conclusion and your results were good arrow flight and an arrow going where you wanted then I would not worry about this happening ocassionaly. I think sometimes people can get so caught up in the hold and "controlling" the shot that they can't get off the string or when they do it's with poor results. Remember results are why you are doing the work. If I thought I was running my shot albeit too quickly, and not with the best flight or results, and I wanted to remind myself to hold I would draw down on a tree at point blank and just hold, there is no pressure to let it go, your mind is telling you not to but your muscles are getting taxed into "remembering" to hold a little longer.

THe best shots I have ever made on paper, foam or game have been the ones where I ran my shot perfectly and saw the fletch bury before I knew it was away.
When you take your kid hunting and he says thank you and tells you how much he loves being in the woods with you, your day just isn't going to get any better than that.
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