Skip to content


HC30 vs HC300

A Place to Post Your Collectable Bows, Archery and Hunting Equipment

HC30 vs HC300

Postby Steve Milbocker » Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:38 pm

As I've stated before I have a real soft spot for the target bows of the golden age. After getting the 65 Tamerlane from Dick I'm damn near pocessed by them. Can anybody tell me what if any differences there are in the way they shoot? I can't imagine the newer models could be any smoother than the Black Beauty. I've been eyeballin a 68 and was just curious.
United States Of America
Born July 4, 1776
Died Nov. 4, 2008
Suicide
User avatar
Steve Milbocker
 
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:22 am
Location: Otsego Mi


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby Jett » Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:54 pm

Steve - Think I was eyeballin' the same ones on the 'bay. Whole lotta stuff going at fairly decent prices now that I can't afford them, LOL!

Never shot either of these but would like to. Bet George has (he's shot/owned about everything!)
"Plungers are for toilets." - Hank
Jett
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 5:40 am


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby KODIAK » Mon Feb 09, 2009 9:31 pm

I've been watchin that 68 too. It's a beaut.

Can't say for sure on the shootability. I'd imagine they are similar but I will say that the later 60s Bears have cruder, blockier tips than the early to mid 60s varieties. Not sure specifically about the Tamerlane though. More "mass" production in play I'd assume.
User avatar
KODIAK
 
Posts: 1400
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 5:12 pm
Location: Minnesoootaah USA


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby George D. Stout » Mon Feb 09, 2009 9:33 pm

I owned an HC-300 but not the HC-30. Mine had the micarta riser with rosewood caps like the 68 and 69 Super Kodiaks.
It was 66" and 42# and quite a shooter. It was fast, but not nearly as smooth as the Hoyt Pro Medalist I traded it for.
:D
User avatar
George D. Stout
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:37 am
Location: Mann Choice, Pa.


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby Steve Milbocker » Tue Feb 10, 2009 5:40 am

That 68 that we are all eyeballin has been cut past center. He did a nice job on it but that would affect collector value wouldn't it? Kodiak, they did have blockier limb tips,I noticed that too. George, the 65 I have is just like liquid,0 hand shock, but then it feels like it weighs 12# too :lol: That Hoyt must be quite a shooter. I'd like to shoot an HC 300 before I stick my neck out on one. The 68 were looking at, the reserve is 275. Anybody going for it?
United States Of America
Born July 4, 1776
Died Nov. 4, 2008
Suicide
User avatar
Steve Milbocker
 
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:22 am
Location: Otsego Mi


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby kbel5 » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:31 am

I have a hc 300 in the line up for refinishing.
If your not in a huge hurry Steve, its in bad shape, but shootable
It looks like somebody spray painted finish on it, runs, orange peel.
Thats how I get them cheap, I buy f#cked up ones and refinish
I'll send you this one to try out.
Just take care the shipping.
Kurt
kbel5
 
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:07 pm


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby Steve Milbocker » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:47 am

Are you fixing it up to sell? By the time I pay shipping both ways I'll have 60 bucks in it, I may as well invest that in a purchase. Thanks for the offer Kurt.
United States Of America
Born July 4, 1776
Died Nov. 4, 2008
Suicide
User avatar
Steve Milbocker
 
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:22 am
Location: Otsego Mi


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby KODIAK » Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:12 am

Steve, no I'm not going to bid on it. Usually I just like to watch. :P

It's a very nice looking bow, but imo a $275 reserve for an altered and refinished 68 Tamerlane is a little on the high side. Not horribly high, but a little. ;) But no ones opinion should sway your decision on bidding on a bow or not. Ultimately all of us are different and willing to spend more on certain bows that we really like and MUST have. :P
User avatar
KODIAK
 
Posts: 1400
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 5:12 pm
Location: Minnesoootaah USA


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby kbel5 » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:04 am

Kodiak nailed it, nice work, 275 for a bow that will shoot for years is a decent deal,but not a collector for most.

Steve no, not for sale, I add to my wall with the ones I get cheap. ;)
I don't have many untouched bows that might bring a premium, most are good models that needed a face lift.

Bow Doc and Droptine's work probably will retain a lot of their value, for return on investment, you pretty much have to stick to untouched bows.

The mid 60's Polars with the yellow limbs, are a sweet shooting target bow you can still find fairly cheap.

I feel like I'm watching the real estate market a few years ago, some of those bows are just going for to much money, I don't think they will get their money out, if that's what they want.
kbel5
 
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:07 pm


Re: HC30 vs HC300

Postby George D. Stout » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:10 am

My thoughts on the HC-300 is that it is fast and starts the draw heavy or heavier than some other bows. The limbs are short in comparison to the long riser and that will give quickness, but not as much smoothness as a more deflexed model.
The HC-300 has a pretty much crisp shot pocess; meaning it is very taut at full draw and releases from the hand/fingers abruptly. In my opinion, it moves too much on the shot/aftershot....not because it doesn't have enough mass, but because of the geometry (my opinion only and not to be considered accurate 8^)). That is the reason I said I was happy to make the trade for the Hoyt Pro Medalist. Now that is a bow that will open your eyes to the all around quality of a good target bow.
User avatar
George D. Stout
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:37 am
Location: Mann Choice, Pa.

Next

Return to Board index

Return to Collectors Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest